FAQ – How is the Sling Library Funded?

The simple answer is it isn’t, the library doesn’t received any external funding to run.  Instead the idea is that it pays for itself through the rentals and donations.

It’s taken a while, but for the most part the Sling Library sessions do now just about manage to pay for themselves in a sustainable way.  By this I mean it earns enough to cover on going insurance costs and of course for the slings and carriers themselves.  Interestingly, the library alone does not earn enough to pay for my training or my time.  In an ideal world it would, but in reality I’ve found the balance between keeping both the sessions and the hire fees at a accessable and affordable level has meant that these costs are simply not covered by the library.  And so I simply choose to donate the time these sessions and the resulting admin takes.

I think this might be a real suprise to many library users reading this.  I am often asked (particularly during busy sessions) why I don’t simply run more sessions.  Or if I could start this weeks session 20 minutes earlier because someone has x commitment, or if they can arrive as the session is finishing because they have y commitment.  And while I would love to run more sessions, and run longer sessions and would love to help everyone find the right sling and become completely confident using it….  I have to balance this with the needs of my family and what I can sustainably manage to offer while not charging for my time.  I have balance my desire to keep the sessions and hire fees affordable and how much time I can afford to donate for free without negatively impacting on my family.  For now this balance has been acheived at 3-4 sessions a month – or at least when the sessions stick to time and don’t run over!

Sessions running over is something I continually struggle with!  If I sometimes seem impatient with questions and requests when its already 20, or 30 minutes after the end of the session time please forgive me.  Please understand that my frustration is not at you but my own internal struggle to between wanting to help and wanting to answer ALL the questions and my guilt that I haven’t made lunch for my daughter yet, and I need to pick my son up in 2 hours and I promised I’d fix that thing for him before he got back and I’m now worried I won’t get time and I am starting to feel that frustration that something that I do to satisfy my need to volunteer and help is now taking more of my time and resources than I can afford to give.  I know that I need to get better at drawing these sessions to a close.  It’s hard when someone is front of you asking for help to say no, but in reality these sessions can only remain affordable and accessable if I can keep them to time and if those who do need more help (and can afford to) take the private consultation or workshop route instead.  Particularly as it is private consultations, workshops and sale of slings that pay for my training costs, for my time and plug any gaps in finance that the Library side has.  Again these don’t make huge amounts, but they do keep it all going and make it possible!

The other question I often get around funding is about the slings and carriers themselves.  Many people assume that the brands simply give me these carriers, but in reality this is extremely rare.  Most I have bought.  A small number I’ve received in exchange for working at a show or product testing and a similarly small number I’ve been very kindly gifted by the brands or distributors directly.  But the vast majorty I’ve paid for.  Fortunately, most I’ve been able to buy at discounted rate – as many brands recognise the importance of Sling Libraries in allowing potential customers to try before they buy.  With new carriers being released all the time this is of course an ongoing process!! Hire fees and donations from the Sling Library sessions are constantly used on purchasing new carriers to keep collection upto date and meet demand for more popular carriers.

So how can you help the Sling Library Survive and Thrive?  Amazingly, there are several things you can do to help the Sling Library without spending any money at all:

  1. Tell you friends!  Whether you’ve been to a sling library or not, telling your friends, a new parent or expectant parent can make a huge difference.  Personal recommendations are always more powerful than any paid adverstising and often people have never heard of a sling library or are not sure how one might help them but are delighted to discover they exist once someone tells them about it.
  2. Write us a review on Google or Facebook.  Reviews and recommendations on social media help people find us.
  3. Comment on our posts on Facebook and Instagram, maybe even consider sharing a post occasionally.  The more comments and shares a posts gets the more that people get to see that post and other similar posts.  Simply liking a post no longer helps it get a wide distribution – so the best way you can help any small business or Sling Library is to comment on their posts as this helps Facebook know to show more people this post!  Its sad but true but most of my posts are show to only half, often a lot less than half of those who like my page let alone anyone new.  But those posts that do get comments go out to far far more people and can really help get the message out to as many new parents as possible.

 

-Madeleine

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Woven FAQ – Knots! Part 2 – Slip Knots and Ring Finishes

In Part 1 I covered the most common knot used to tie a woven or stretchy wrap – the Double knot (Flat Reef or Granny).  While the double knot is very secure its not adjustable – if you want to adjust your wrap (maybe to feed, or maybe to alter slightly as baby falls asleep or wakes up) then you might want to an adjustable knot.  There are two – the Slip Knot and a Ring Finish.

 

The Slip Knot

As it’s name suggests the Slip Knot is adjustable – allowing you to loosen and tighten the wrap through the knot as needed while still holding very securely.   This knot is made by one end staying dead straight (the passive end – this is the one that will “slip”) while the other end (active) is used to tie 2 looped knots around the straight end.

The interesting thing to note that there are actually a staggering 8 ways to tie this knot!  Depending on the direction of each of your two looped knots and which end you use as the passive.  The important thing to realise is that all 8 variations are “correct”, secure and are slip knots.  I say this as someone who spent literally about a month watching and rewatching videos to learn how to tie a slip knot, trying desperately to follow and remember the method and which way to go next without ever understanding how the knot worked.  I am convinced I repeated untied perfectly serviceable slip knots just because they didn’t look exactly like the one in the video!

IMG_20181124_105306_204IMG_20181124_105306_203

This is because to get the classic shape you so often see on videos and instruction manuals you need to tie the second loop in the opposite direction to the first.  This is not something most of us do easily… so if it doesn’t come easily to you, don’t fret!  Just tie that second loop the same way as the first and you’ll still get a perfectly functional secure slip knot.

 

The Ring Finish

Technically not a knot at all, the ring finish simply uses a ring to fasten the two ends of the wrap.  The advantages of using a ring instead of a knot are:

  • it requires less length – so a good option if you don’t have much wrap left to make a knot with
  • it’s adjustable – both ends can be adjusted through the ring by pulling on the fabric either side of the ring
  • its pretty!  And looks fancy!

The disadvantage, however is as both sides do adjust by pulling depending on the width of your ring and how “grippy” verses “slippery” your wrap is you might find the ring finish might loosen off with time so you you might need re-adjust from time to time.  Although, if you do find this happening its worth simply switching to a smaller ring diameter.

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To create you simply pull a loop of fabric though the ring, then thread the other end through the gap created by the loop and the ring together and then pull to tighten up … trapping it between the ring and the first end.  The only part to be mindful over is the ring you use.  I always advise people purchase rings made for this purpose – rings that are safe for babies to chew on and safe to hold weight with no weak points, no weld and no sharp bits.  Sling rings come in 3 sizes – small, medium and large, and generally a medium ring is perfect for most wraps.  If you have a particularly thin or thick wrap you might need small or large rings respectively.

Happy Knotting!

-Madeleine

Woven FAQ – Knots! Part 1 – the Secure Double Knot

Knots are undoubtly the biggest thing that worries people new to or considering using woven wraps.  I frequently hear “I am not very good at knots”, “I am not sure I trust myself to tie it properly” or even “what if the knot becomes undone”.  And I remember thinking exactly the same first time I saw someone wrap.  I thought, gosh no… I never could figure out knots while in the Girl Guides and I am not going to be able to figure it out now on the minimal sleep of a new parent.

But actually its really not that complicated.  It’s not like in Girl Guides or Boy Scouts where someone is going to sneak up behind you and go OH NO, that’s not a Bowman’s Hitch thats a Sheeps Head or some nonsense.  Honestly, I’ve got no idea what either of those knots are and nor do I care.  When it comes to learning to use a woven or a stretchy wrap you really only need to know one knot – A Secure Double Knot.

Yep you heard that right – a double knot Literally any secure double knot …. i.e. tie a bog standand single knot and then tie it again.  And your done.  It’s secure, its going nowhere, its as safe as houses.  And I mean this… when I do get a parent who is worried about a knot spontenously untying during use, I challenge them to try… tie a knot then wiggle it… pull on one end unevenly, jump around … etc.  Do whatever you like to it, so long as you’ve tied 2 knots its going nowhere unless you actually, purposefully untie it.  And the more you wiggle, jump up and down and so forth all that happens is the knot gets tighter and more secure!

There are 4 ways to tie double knot – and depending which you use you will either get a Granny Knot or a Flat Reef Knot.  Both are equally secure so it really doesn’t matter which you use.  The Granny knot is easier to tie because you do the same motion twice – right over left x2 or left over right x2.  So intutively its easier to do!  The advantage of the Flat Reef knot is simply that it is flatter so sits more comfortably against your body than the Granny knot (particularly if you sit down!).  If you want to try a Flat Reef Knot simply remember that you need to go the other way on the second knot … i.e. tie the first knot as you would usually and then go the way that doesn’t feel natural to you on the second… and Viola! You have a Flat Reef Knot!  But if somehow all your attempts at Flat Reef Knots end in Granny’s … don’t fret, it really doesn’t matter… you wrap job will be just as secure and just as cosy for you and baby!

-Madeleine

FAQ – How soon can I carry after birth? What if I had a Cesarean birth?

20161127_102248How soon after birth can I use a sling?

As soon as you feel able!  As soon as you feel able!  I’ve known parents to carry right from the first day if they’ve felt well enough to do so.  The important thing is to listen to your body – you’ve just given birth!  So do take it easy on your body and give yourself time to heal but if you feel strong enough to give it a go.  Go for it!

Just ensure the baby is worn “high and tight” so there is no pressure on your recovering pelvic floor.  What you are looking for is to have the baby high enough on your chest so that their ear is over your heart and/or the top of their head is close enough to kiss.  And then tight enough that if you leant forward the baby wouldn’t draw away from you significantly.  This tightness a) helps them feel more secure and prevents them slumping within the sling and b) it helps ensure the weight is evenly distrubted for you.  When a sling is too loose, the baby feels heavier and this extra pull often manifests as pressure on your core and pelvic floor – both of which have just had a heavy workout during birth and we want to ensure aren’t carrying the load… so being confident in getting that tightness just right is key!  This is definitely something that if your not sure about it is well worth seeking out a babywearing consultant or a sling library drop in session and just checking because nailing that tightness makes an absolute world of difference.

 

What if I had a cesarean birth?

The exact same rules apply – as long as the carrier is high and tight and not putting any pressure on your scar or core there is no reason not to carry.   It’s not like exercise you don’t have to wait for 6 or 12 weeks or any arbitarty point.  It’s quite simply when you feel ready and while I’ve definitely known parents who’ve felt ready a week or so after a section, I’ve known others whose recovery has taken longer and its been more like 5 or 6 weeks.

The one thing I would avoid is any carrier with a very heavy waist band at this point, but carriers such as the Caboo or stretchy wrap are absolutely perfect for those early days when you are still healing.

Woven FAQ – Brands

Buying your first woven wrap – deciding what to buy – can often be the most intimating part of wrapping.  There is a startling array of different brands, blends and designs.  It can be terrifying to work out where to start!  ‘Woven FAQ’ is my attempt to answer some of the questions I am asked the most by people buying their 1st wrap, and to cover the most important points to consider.

Next up in the series is:

What brand(s) do you recommend?

In a way this is the hardest question to answer because there are so many great brands out there.  Literally loads, and if I tried to make a complete list I worry it would confuse more people than it would help!  Instead, I have stuck to great brands which are easily accessible.  Easily accessible in that a) its easy to get hold of their wraps in the UK, b) there are always wraps in stock and c) that they are common place enough that your local library or sling meet etc are likely to have an example or two for you to try to get an idea before you buy.  Finally, hopefully, accessible in budget too.

Budget is always the most contentious point!  It can seem like a large outlay for what is essentially a long length of fabric, but when it comes to wraps there is an element of “you get what you pay for”.   There is a clear difference between wraps around the £100 mark and those around the £40-£50 mark in terms of quality and ease of wrapping with.

However, if those prices scare you, there are some real deals to be had on the second hand market.  In fact, while I am the sort of person who normally prefers to buy new… wraps are my one exception.  Generally wraps will last a long time and actually get softer and easier to wrap with with use – this process is called ‘breaking in’.  From new many wraps can be quite stiff and feel a bit like cardboard but soften with washing and wear.  While some people love this breaking in process, I for one am completely lazy.  I’d rather fast forward to the bit where the wrap feels really lovely and is really easy to use and not go through all the hard work of breaking it in myself! For this reason I massively prefer to either buy wraps second hand that have already been broken in for me or to buy new wraps that already come soft and require very little or no breaking in.  If you are buying new, how easy your new wrap will be to break in is definitely something worth considering!

It’s also worth noting that as well as catering to different budgets, different brands have different aesthetics.  So its worth looking at a few to find one that matches up with your personal style.  Because, simply put, if you love it you’ll wear it.  So more than anything, choose something that you really love.

So, below are the brands I recommend as a starting point for someone buying their first wrap.  Prices quoted are that for a basic size 6 cotton wrap.  The price will of course vary depending on what size wrap you are after and expect to pay a little more for thicker weave wraps and/or different fibre blends.  Also note these prices are based on buying new, so if are going for a second hand wrap feel free to use this as a guide to help you judge if your getting a good deal etc!

  • Didymos – £95-120.  Didymos are #1 on my list for a reason – they are a family run business that have been making wraps since 1972 and really know what they’re doing.  Plus they have a staggering range of different weaves and styles.  There’s literally something from everyone.  While that standard stripes are a little harder work to break in, their Jacquard wraps are utterly gorgeous and usually break in and become absolutely lovely really fast.  In particular if your buying for a new baby take a look at their double face range and their Lisca range as these are normally lusciously soft right out of the box.  But really any of their Prima’s, Ada’s or limited edition Jacquard weaves soften up pretty quickly and are mighty fine wraps.
  • Girasol – £70-85.  Girasol are renowned for their beautiful stripey wraps.  Stripes definitely help flatten the learning curve, and in particular Girasol stripes are brilliant because they are beautiful but also their wraps are really easy to care for – easy to wash, not prone to pulls or snags and are absolutely brilliant newborn all the way to preschoolers and beyond because they are thin yet supportive.  All their wraps are handwoven in Guatemala by local artisans, Girasol are big believers in fair trade and have been making wraps since 1981.  While these cotton wraps do usually start of a bit stiff they do go really floppy and soft with a few washes and use.
  • Firespiral ~£150.  British made, mum made… designed and made entirely in the North of England, these wraps are just lovely.  Luxurious, beautiful, and softer than a kitten belly.  Firespiral have the knack of making wraps that can practically wrap themselves!  They are so soft they are lovely for the tiniest of newborns but still strong enough and supportive enough to carry preschoolers and beyond.  Yes they are more expensive than others listed here, and they are a little pull prone, but I do think they really worth it.  Plus if you are totally new to wrapping Firespiral do run their excellent Fledgling scheme aimed at reducing the learning curve and price hurdle of purchasing your first woven.
  • Jacq and Rose ~£140.  Another British, mum made brand.  These wraps are super soft from the get go and so easy to learn with.  They are the ultimate teaching wraps with their contrasting sides and a pattern that helps you easily distinguish the top from the bottom and divides the wraps into thirds.  They are teaching wraps that don’t look like teaching wraps! Just stylish and geometric!  Perfect for beginners and seasoned wrappers alike.

If buying second hand and looking for a bargain I’d also take a look at Hoppediz, Storchenweige, Lenny Lamb and Joy and Joe.  These are all lovely once broken in and not budget busting and while maybe not my first choice from brand new as they can come a little stiffer … they can all be great once broken in.

-Madeleine

 

FAQ – How do you neatly fold up a buckle carrier?

I am often asked to share this trick! So here it is … no more unruly straps poking out of bags, nor large tangled messes that won’t even fit in the bag in the first place!!

  1. Start with the carrier laid out in front of you (on floor, sofa or on your knee)
  2. Fold the arm straps onto the top part of the carriers main panel
  3. Fold any head support and/or hood down over the arm straps
  4. Start rolling the panel down from the top down towards the waist band
  5. Close the waist band around the carrier, tightening as needed to hold

The carrier shown is the Beco Gemini, but this trick works with the vast majority of buckle carriers and not just this one.  It also works on some Meh Dai and half buckles too.

-Madeleine

Which Ergo?

Ergobaby carriers are really popular, and it’s very easy to see why.  They are very well made, well designed and fit a wide range of parents and babies.  They don’t fit everyone of course – like any buckle carrier it’s definitely worth trying on before you buy – as different brands fit different body types differently.  As a general rule Ergo’s are on the bulkier side so its worth checking the padding agrees with your shoulders and they can often feel too much on smaller frames.  But for many many people they fit like a dream and for them Ergo carriers represent a fantastic option.

What takes most people by surprise, however, is just how many different models there are!  Over the last few years, Ergo have brought out a new carrier or new variant on one of their existing models out every single year!  Most people coming to the sling library ask me simply if they can try “THE” Ergo, but there are 4 main models and then 3 of these models have mesh versions – 2 of which differ from the non-mesh version in ways other than simply having mesh.  So it does take a bit of thought to work out which model will suit you best.

So what are the differences?  How do I help people work out “Which Ergo?”  There are 3 main factors to consider when comparing each model;

  1. Would you like to use this carrier with a newborn/baby under 4 months old? (While in theory all can be used from newborn, 2 of these models require the use of a bulky infant insert that most parents don’t get on well with, while the other two have a really great adjustable seat which removes the need for any inserts).
  2. Would you like the option to face baby outwards?  (All 4 models offer front facing inwards, hip and back carrying positions, only 2 offer the outward facing position as well).
  3. Would you like the option to cross the straps across the adult’s back? (All models can be worn in ‘Rucksack’ mode, but only 2 give you the option to cross the straps as well).

I also encourage parents to think about budget and how much value they place on each of these considerations, because there is of course a price difference!   And its not insignificant – the difference between answering no to all 3 questions and answering yes to all 3 is currently £55!  With prices in between for each iteration in between.  So its very much worth considering the pros and cons of each carrier in conjunction with the price.

So with all these considerations in mind – lets look at each model in turn…

The Original

  • Requires an infant insert
  • Weight tested from 5.4 kg (12 lb) to 20 kg (45 lb) without the insert, from 3.2 kg (7 lb) with the insert
  • Does not offer a facing outwards position
  • Straps can not be worn crossed across parents back
  • Has an absolutely huge pocket that will easily fit a nappy or two, wipes and a few other essentials
  • Cost £99.90*

Where the Ergo Original really shines is for babies aged 6 months to ~2 years. Its the simplest, and cheapest of all the Ergo models and it is a great carrier for older babies through to toddlers. It has a slightly shorter back panel than the other models (as it doesn’t have a fold up head support that also acts to extend the panel) so it won’t last quite as long as each of the others but it will nonetheless last well into toddler-hood.  While the Original can be used for newborns, it requires the addition of the Easy Snug Infant insert – which in all honestly is a faff, pretty darn hot and seems to confuse literally every parent I’ve ever met.  If you want a carrier you can use from the beginning, I would avoid anything with an infant insert.  The newest version of this model now features the same amazing lumbar support panel as seen on the Adapt and the Omni. Previous versions of this model just had webbing only, and the lumbar support is a nice addition.

Mesh Version – Ergo are not currently selling a mesh version of the Original carrier.  They did sell a mesh version in the past (I think it was called the Ergo Performance), but this is no longer on the market.

 

The All Position 360

  • IMG_2452Requires an infant insert
  • Weight tested from 5.4 kg (12 lb) to 20 kg (45 lb) without the insert, from 3.2 kg (7 lb) with the insert
  • Adjustable head support
  • Does offer forward facing carrying position
  • Straps can not be worn crossed across parents back
  • Has a wide Velcro waistband
  • Cost £134.90*

The 360 is the model I am most frequently asked for – it’s the one everyone has heard of!  It’s not necessarily the one people most frequently go onto buy, however!  Like the Original it needs the bulky hot infant insert to carry a newborn, so this is a carrier that works best from ~4 or 5 months.  It has a slightly narrower seat than the Original so does tend to work a bit earlier, typically from 4-5 months rather than ~6 months for the Original.  It also has a longer back panel, because the head support can be used to extend the length of the panel, which means this carrier will often last a little longer too – typically until around 2.5 years, maybe even 3 years with a relatively petite child.

What’s really popular about this carrier is the deep ‘bucket’ style seat for the baby, which gives an excellent position for babies in both the parent facing and the facing outwards position.  Swapping between the two carrying positions is as simple as switching over a couple of buttons (“When facing away, go to Grey!”).

IMG_2455The two things that can be less popular are the waist band and the ruck sack style shoulder straps.  The 360 has a very wide Velcro waistband.  Some parents absolutely love this waistband as they find it fits them better because of how wide and form fitting it is, and how it’s continuous and thus there isn’t any webbing to dig etc.  However, the vast majority don’t find they get a better fit with the Velcro, find more traditional webbing easier to tighten correctly and dislike the noise and clothes ruining potential that comes with Velcro!  I can’t count how many times that Velcro has woken babies up during Sling Library sessions – it can be really annoying!  For the straps, again like the Original, the straps do not cross across the parents back on the All Position 360.  Many parents really struggle to get the chest strap done up on their back and thus opt for the Omni 360 or another carrier to avoid this struggle!  However, if the Velcro waist or the Ruck sack straps put you off, don’t despair as both the next two models have these sorted!

All in all the 360 is a good option if your baby is 4-5 months plus, you’d like to be able to forward face, you like velcro and have flexible shoulders allowing you to easily do up the chest strap.

Mesh VersionAll Position 360 Cool Air Mesh, cost £144.90*

Interestingly, the 360 Cool Air does not have the Velcro waist band.  Instead, it has webbing and the same lovely lumbar support found on the Adapt and Omni 360.  The shape of the carrier and the shoulder straps and everything else remain unchanged, its just the waist band that differs.  The waist band, and of course the presence of Ergo’s “Cool Air Mesh”.  As mesh goes, this is very very soft and not at all scratchy.  Although there isn’t really that much of it.  Only the upper panel, the leg padding and one side of the shoulder straps (the side touching the parent) has been replaced with mesh.  So the jury is out on how much cooler this carrier is verses the standard cotton version.

 

The Adapt

  • 20170906_173009Adjustable seat – no infant insert
  • Weight tested from 3.2 kg (7 lb) to 20 kg (45 lb)
  • Adjustable head support
  • Does not offer a facing outwards position
  • Straps can be worn crossed across parents back
  • Lumbar support
  • Cost £119.90*

This is my favourite of the Ergo models.  It was the first Ergo to offer the amazing lumbar support panel and to offer the option to cross the straps across the wearers back.  These two things make such a difference to parent comfort and ease of use for me.  I am not very flexible and have always struggled to do up the chest strap on the Original and the 360 so at last having an Ergo where I could cross the straps and avoid that strap altogether was a big deal for me!  Although my one and only bug bear about the lumbar support is that it is not removable and it does look a bit funny across your tummy when carrying baby on your back.  That said it is supremely comfy and feels a bit like wearing a tummy support!  But out of vanity I’d probably remove it if I could for back carrying!!  The other reason this is my favourite model is the adjustable seat.  It adjusts using velcro within the carrier and poppers on the outside… to give an absolutely beautiful fit to any baby from about 4-6 weeks old all the way through till 2-2.5 years old.  The bucket shape of the seat make it so easy for parents to get a good positioning and super comfortable carry for both them and their little one.

The one thing the Adapt doesn’t do is allow baby to face forwards.  It offers 3 carrying positions – front facing inwards, hip and back carry.  For both my children these 3 positions have always been enough, neither have really needed or wanted to forward face.  If your debating the pros and cons of forward facing this article might help!  However, if you want to forward face but like all the advantages of the Adapt over the All Position 360 then the Omni is most likely the carrier for you.

Mesh VersionAdapt Cool Air Mesh, cost £129.90*

The Adapt is available in a mesh version, and unlike the 360 and the Omni there are no differences (aside from mesh of course!) between the mesh and cotton versions of the Adapt.  A large proportion of the carrier is replaced with mesh and a very soft mesh, so I would expect this carrier to be a fair bit more breathable than the cotton version, and worth considering if you travel a lot, have a summer born baby and/or someone who finds they get hot easily.

 

The Omni 360

  • IMG_20170828_230307_088Adjustable seat – no infant insert
  • Weight tested from 3.2 kg (7 lb) to 20 kg (45 lb)
  • Adjustable head support
  • Does offer forward facing carrying position
  • Straps can be worn crossed across parents back
  • Lumbar support
  • Cost £154.90*

The Omni really is the model that offers absolutely everything.  It has a super simple and intuitively easy to adjust seat, which is very similar to the Adapt and allows this carrier to be realistically used for babies from  4-6 weeks old all the way to 2-2.5 years.  The size adjustment is done via Velcro tabs, which are conveniently colour coded to help you know how to size it for your baby as they grow.   Like the All Positions 360, the Omni can be used for forward facing and has the same buttons which allow it to be simply switched from inward to outward facing modes (“When facing away, go to Grey!”).  Like the Adapt it has the lovely lumbar support panel and the option to cross the straps across parents back for increased parent comfort.  It also has safety buckles at the sides, which can be easily opened with one hand (once you’ve got the knack!)  And a detachable zippered pocket on the waist band.

The one and only thing it doesn’t have is a small price tag!  But then that is the price of everything and for many parents the improved parent comfort verses the 360 and the ability to forward face compared with the Adapt makes the extra price tag worth it.  It’s worth paying the extra if it means you get more use out of the sling.

Mesh VersionOmni 360 Cool Air Mesh, cost £129.90*

The main difference with this version (other than the presence of mesh) is that the buttons that you use to switch between inward and outward facing carrying positions have been replaced with sliders.  While the buttons are a nice intuitively easy system for switching they are a bit fiddly to do with one hand and thus hard to do while holding baby or with baby still in the carrier.  The sliders on the other hand are dead easy to change with one hand – you just push.  Its a fab update and one I hope will be rolled out onto the other 360 models in the future.

 

All in all Ergo have 4 great carriers and its worth spending a few minutes considering the differences so you can ensure you can get the one that suits your needs and budget!  Ergo do also make a stretchy wrap which is lovely for newborns and as a soft around the home sling.  You can read more about their wrap here.

 

-Madeleine

*Please note all prices quoted here are based on RRP, and are correct as of April 2018.  Ergo and other stockists do offer sales from time to time and the RRP may well change overtime so please don’t take these prices as Gospel!